Saturday, May 23, 2020

Christopher Columbus, Mariner, by Samuel Eliot Morison Essay

Christopher Columbus was born in the port city of Genoa, Italy in 1451. His father was a wool weaver named Domenico Columbo. As a boy, Christopher had no schooling. He and his younger brother Bartholomew helped their father by carding raw wool. Christopher grew up to be a tall, red-haired, quiet and deeply religious man. He worked for his father until he was 22. He went out with the sardine fishing fleets, as other Genoese boys did and he sailed along the coast to Corsica on business for his father. Genoese traders had their own schooners as did Christopher Columbus’ father. He made at least one trip to the North African coast. On long trips such as these, Christopher learned the elements of seamanship.†¦show more content†¦Felipa’s high social rank enabled Columbus to meet important officials. She also gave him her father’s collection of charts and documents. From these Columbus gained more knowledge of Portuguese discoveries and plans. In 1481, he entered the service of King John II of Portugal and voyaged to the gold coasts of Africa. During that time the wealth of Asia was being discovered and Europeans were eager for more of it. Asian goods had to be brought over to Europe through a perilous overland route which made them scarce and expensive. Ships could carry the good more cheaply and with greater quantity. To reach India, China, Japan and the East Indies the Portuguese were trying to make a route that stretched all around the coast of Africa for trading. Another possibility was across the Atlantic Ocean. At the time all educated men knew that the world was round and that Asia was west of Europe. But, no one knew how far it was. Columbus’ studies lead him to believe that the Earth was much smaller than it really was so Asia was a lot farther than he thought. He made his calculations based on evidence from sources such as the Bible, the writing of Marco Polo, and Pierre d’Ailly’s ‘Imago Mundi’ (picture of the world). He only accepted the information that supported his beliefs and he rejected everything else. Columbus was determined to cross theShow MoreRelated Little Portugal Fills Big Shoes Essay1728 Words   |  7 Pagesearly exploration. The Portuguese wanted to leave an impression on the areas they encountered; they strived to spread an important aspect of their lives, Christianity. Portuguese motives can easily be recognized through the voice of a prominent mariner of the land, Vasco Da Gama. When his purpose was questioned by local authorities of Calicut in 1498, he stated, â€Å"Christians and spices† (Bentley 370). Trading posts were quickly established in a number of areas by the Portuguese, and these connectionsRead MoreStudy Guide Essay example790 Words   |  4 Pagespages 1-11? His thesis for the first eleven pages is to describe past events as they happened. Regarding Columbus, Zinn wouldn’t glorify him as a hero, because he wasn’t. He was violent and greedy and would describe him as such. 3. According to Zinn, how is Columbus portrayed in traditional history books? as an enlightened, peaceful explorer who befriended the native people. Christopher Columbus, portrayed by Zinn as an agent of conquest with a lust for gold and other resources, was one who had theRead MoreChristopher Columbus As A Hero1211 Words   |  5 Pagescelebrate Columbus Day; whether Christopher Columbus, the man with a holiday named after him, the man who â€Å"discovered† America, was really hero. There are people who claim that Columbus was, in fact, someone to be celebrated. This is false. Christopher Columbus was, most blatantly put, a villain. He deserves this status because he did not discover the land now known as America, he forced his beliefs onto others, and he utterly destroyed the lives of unknowing, innocent people. Christopher Columbus is mainlyRead MoreSummary : Columbus, The Indians, And Human Progress1389 Words   |  6 PagesDahuya Date: August 8, 2016 Period: 1 Chapter 1: Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress 1. Important People In this section, you will list the important people that are presented in the chapter with a short description of that individual. (Approximately one sentence each) Arawak people- Natives of the Bahamas Islands that Christopher Columbus came upon; they are known for their hospitality and their belief in sharing. Christopher Columbus- A merchant s clerk from the Italian city of GenoaRead MoreEssay on Christopher Columbus Influenced Spain and Europe2243 Words   |  9 Pagescentury was a time of change and Europe and Spain made the effort to move to the American lands. Spain and Europe did not know what to expect when it came to traveling to the new world. Soon came of Chistoforo Columbo or Cristobal Colon, born in 1446. Columbus as he is known after his death in 1506 changed the world for Europe, Spain and the New World. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;In the time of Europe many difficulties came across. The trade to the new word became a trade boom in the 15th century.Read MoreThe European Domination Of Native Americans3308 Words   |  14 Pagestroubles. This desire for economic gain finally gave a reason for exploiting the resources and land of native Americans.Some historians believe the trouble started with Columbus and according to one historian, Samuel Eliot Morison: â€Å"The cruel policy initiated by Columbus and pursued by his successors resulted in complete genocide.† Mariner also claimed that â€Å"Behind the English invasion of North America, behind their massacre of Indians, theirdeception, their brutality, was that special powerful driveRead More Christopher Columbus Motivations to Sail West for the Indies3756 Words   |  16 PagesChristopher Columbus Motivations to Sail West for the Indies Christopher Columbus lived in an age of Moslem expansion in the east. With the fall of Constantinople in 1453, direct land routes to the Indies were closed to European merchants and traders, thus creating the need to find a sea route to the Indies. Portugal had spent years sailing the coast of Africa to reach the Indies, but Columbus thought he had a better way: sailing west. With the defeat of the Moors in 1492 Queen Isabella

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Effect Of Drug Effects On The Performance System - 3109 Words

Abstract Interactions between multiple drug substances, taken in combination or simultaneously, may yield excessive risk of adverse effect. However, this increase risk is not uniform for all combinations. Some combinations may show a constant risk pattern. Collections of individual reporting of an adverse event related to adverse drug reactions have proven to be very useful. A mixture model approach is applied to AERS (adverse effect record system) data to differentiate drug combinations following different patterns. A ranking of the drug combinations is reported using their false discover rate (FDR) values. Introduction Post-approval adverse drug effects (ADEs) are a major global health concern. An estimated cost of $ 75 billion per year [1] has been attributed to these ADEs alongwith more than 2 million injuries, hospitalizations and deaths in each year in the US alone [2]. It has become an important area of research to study the effect of drug-drug interactions. For example, in treatment of cancer sometimes cytotoxic drugs are used. It becomes very important to study the effects of DDI among these drugs at all levels. Failure to recognize these effects may lead to a lot of undesired complications ranging from overdosing to undertreatment. Drug interactions can be pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic (PK), or pharmacodynamic (PD). PK interaction occurs when a drug influences the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) process of another drug. For example,Show MoreRelatedThe Legalization Of Steroids Should Be Beneficial For The World Of Sport1226 Words   |  5 Pagesnegative view for much of history. Steroids are drugs used by athletes to become stronger and achieve a strong physique. Steroids are illegal and are strongly discouraged to be used and may be seen first expressed during high school with the introduction of organized sport teams. The perspective against the legalization of steroids believes in the many benefits of legalization. The perspective for the legalization of steroid expresses the harmful effects of steroids. My view of the subject is that IRead MorePerformance Drugs Should Not Be Legal1498 Words   |  6 PagesPerformance Drugs Should not be Legal The Center for Disease Control and Prevention did a survey on high schoolers grades 9th through 12th and found out the 4.4% to 5.7% of boys and that 1.9% to 3.8% of girls have used illegal steroids (Fernandez and Robert). High schoolers are not the only ones that take performance enhancing drugs, all sorts of athletes and even nonathletes take them. Taking performance enhancing drugs harms the human body in so many different ways like it harms the Hormonal SystemRead MorePerformance Enhancing Drug Abuse1511 Words   |  7 PagesPerformance enhancing drug abuse is a growing problem in adolescents and athletes. According to the Partnership for Drug – Free Kids, more than five percent of teens use performance enhancing drugs, or steroids increase muscle. Performance enhancing drug abuse creates addiction, the mental tension and pressure that coaches and peers bring to inferior athletes this draws teens and athletes to engage in these products, further encouraging teens to parta ke in the use of performance enhancing drugs,Read MoreEssay about Consequences of Performance Enhancing Drugs1509 Words   |  7 PagesNegative Effects to Performance Enhancing Drugs At the age of 21 Rob Garibaldi committed suicide and it is believed to be from his consumption of performance enhancing drugs. As a young boy, Rob started to play little league, trying to match his favorite sport hero, and dreaming to make it to the baseball major leagues. Prior to high school, Rob was getting pushed by his coaches he had and scouts start to follow him to have him take supplements and more things that will help him gain weight compoundsRead MoreHow Drugs Affects The Body And The Side Effects Of The Drugs1429 Words   |  6 Pagesissue of athletes using drugs in sport to enhance their performance. In my first paragraph I will be talking about the different types of drugs used in sport, how drugs effect the body and the side effects of the drugs. In my second paragraph I will be talking about how the performance enhancing drugs effect the performance of an athlete and why they do/ use the. In my 3rd paragraph I will be talking about the negative and positive effects o f drugs in sport, the main drugs I will be focusing on forRead MoreThe Effects of Performance Enhancing Drugs on Athletes996 Words   |  4 PagesThe Effects of Performance Enhancing Drugs on Athletes The risks of taking performance -enhancing drugs to improve an athletes’ performance outweighs the benefits. Along with the fact that all performance-enhancing drugs are illegal to use in sports, there are also serious side effects and addiction risks to the drugs. Athletes may choose from a variety of drugs and each may achieve different benefits. However, most of the time, athletes are uneducated in their decision to take the drugs, whichRead MoreDoping Testing Should Not Be Banned1669 Words   |  7 PagesRecreation, Business, Education,;Controversy., and Performance-enhancing Drugs). Doping was introduced into sports because people wanted to have an â€Å"extra advantage on their opponents†(Sports in America: Recreation, Business, Education,;Controversy., and Performance-enhancing Drugs). Drug testing was introduced to the world in 1968 at the Olympics (Sports in America: Recreation, Business, Education,;Controversy., and Performance-enhancing Drugs). This paper i s meant to teach the world and yourselfRead MorePerformance Enhancing Drugs ( Peds ) Should Not Be Legalized Essay1481 Words   |  6 Pagesused performance enhancing drugs. Performance Enhancing Drugs (PEDs) have been used in sports for many years, and there use is one of the most important issues among professional athletes. These drugs are detrimental to the human body physically and mentally. These athletes also serve as role models, influencing the younger generation by presenting that’s it acceptable to cheat no matter the consequences. So with all to consider and the evidence that is available, performance enhancing drugs (PEDs)Read MorePerformance Enhancing Drugs Should Be Banned For Athletes600 Words   |  3 Pages Performance Enhancing Drugs Should Be Banned For Athletes The use of Performance Enhancing Drugs(PED) has a major impact on athletes negatively and cause many problems in sports and competitions. These PEDs should be banned for athletes and competitors on any level because they are, unhealthy and harmful to the body, give users an edge over competitors, and it diminishes the true sportsmanship of the game itself. The illegal use of Performance Enhancing Drugs lead to many unhealthy and potentionalyRead MoreAthletes Use Drugs For A Variety Of Reasons1194 Words   |  5 PagesAthletes use drugs for a variety of reasons, such as coping with stress or to enhance their quality of performance, and the effects of using performance enhancing drugs can have long term effects on an individual’s life. A commonly used drug in athletes goes by the name of anabolic steroids. The best way to help clarify your understanding of the importance of anabolic steroids is to define these steroids as a synthetic way to acquire the male sex hormone testosterone. The proper name for these steroids

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Guide to Designing Qualitative Research Free Essays

Guide to Designing Qualitative Research When you are asked to design a qualitative research and write your dissertation or research study using this method, you might be confused where to start. Many students simply assume that qualitative research is based on interviews or observation, and does not need to include literature research, or theses. This is the first misconception of qualitative research methods, and there are many more to come. We will write a custom essay sample on Guide to Designing Qualitative Research or any similar topic only for you Order Now If you would like to be confident that your qualitative research study will be suitable for submission, and you will get great grades, you will need to understand all the requirements of research, studies, structure, and design. Read the below guide to help you understand what qualitative methods entail and how to make the most out of your research. The Role of Qualitative Research Qualitative research is usually carried out to understand the different perspectives of issues and phenomena. It is concerned about human behaviour and experiences. In many cases, it measures attitudes, therefore, the information gained cannot be quantified. Qualitative methods are usually applied in the following fields of study: Health and social care Social studies Humanities Marketing Psychology Teaching Qualitative research, in short, is a research method that focuses on findings that reflect on the complexity of a problem or issue and do not provide statistical or quantifiable information, but – instead – answer the initial research questions of the study. Qualitative research attempts to answer the questions: â€Å"what?† and â€Å"why?†, while quantitative methods focus on â€Å"how many?†. Methods of Qualitative Research There are different methods that researchers can apply to conduct qualitative studies and answer the research questions. Some of them are listed below. Direct observation This method takes into consideration the environment and setting, however, the researcher’s bias might affect the reliability of the information gained. Participant observation This approach requires the researcher to take part in the activities of the group researched and participate in their routines. This method allows a deeper understanding of the issues faced by the group, but can be costly and lengthy. Qualitative interviews There are three main types of interviews used by researchers: Informal Semi-structured Open-ended This approach allows the researcher to take into consideration the individual differences of participants and tailor the questions to their profile. The main disadvantage of qualitative interviews is that the results are hard to analyse. Focus groups This data collection method is often used to predict attitudes of groups towards an issue or product Action research This collaborative method allows the author of the study to manipulate the situation and measure the outcomes, while designing interventions for improvement. Case studies This method is usually applied when a researcher is focusing on one organisation, group, or institution and provides an in-depth analysis of phenomena based on the research question. When to Apply Qualitative Research Qualitiative research can be used when the author would like to test a hypothesis, understand the attitude of individuals or groups towards a service or product, try to develop interventions, meet the needs of a certain consumer or peer group, or capture the language used by the participants. Presenting the Results of Qualitative Research The main goal of presenting the results of the qualitative study is to answer the research questions. Therefore, the interview questions observation strategies need to be built around the research aims and objectives. When presenting the qualitative research results, the author needs to focus on answering the questions and identifying trends. As an example, when researching people’s attitudes towards a new health care service interviewed, the most important emerging themes that were mentioned by participants need to be listed and discussed in the context of the literature. To successfully present the results of the study in qualitative research, you need to: Read the answers or transcripts closely Use sequential text interpretation Take into consideration individual differences and the impact of the setting To identify trends, you might need to use coding that captures the essence of the content Structure of a Qualitative Study The best way of designing a qualitative research method is to use a research protocol. This will help create a methodology that is fit for the purpose of the study. The main parts of the research protocol are: Aims and objectives Background of the study Methods Ethical issues Resources needed to conduct the research Timescale for the research Dissemination plan / output Once the qualitative research protocol is drawn up, you need to get it approved by the supervisor before the study can take place. When structuring the final research paper, you need to have the following sections: Title Using the keywords that represent the purpose of the study, you need to create a title that sums up the content. Abstract Write the abstract after the paper is finished, to summarise the content Background and Context List the information on the topic available through theories and recent research studies, and signify the importance of carrying out the research Design and Methodology Provide the research questions, setting, research methods, epistemological commitments, and the data analysis methods Findings Present the results of the study in a structured, logical format, focusing on the research questions Discussion and Conclusion Reflect back to the research questions and literature research, to present how the results can be interpreted and used to make improvements in your field. Do You Need Help Conducting Qualitative Research? If you already have an idea of what you would like to research, and need help with developing your research questions, protocol, timeline, or choose the right research methodology for your study, you can get in touch with our friendly team at our site who will assist you with your research or dissertation. Alternatively, you can submit your question online and our professional writers will discuss your options and provide personalised answers based on your research topic and field of study. Related Articles: Different Research Methods Used in the Aviation Industry A Critical Discussion of research methods and approaches Dissertation – Different Research Strategies you can use in your dissertation Summary Reviewer Dissertation Ideas – Qualitative Review Date 2017-08-26 Reviewed Item our site – Admin Author Rating 5 How to cite Guide to Designing Qualitative Research, Essays

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Case Study for Department of Administrative- myassignmenthelp

Question: Discuss about theCase Study for Department of Administrative Services. Answer: Develop strategy for protecting informal digital identity It is identified that there are number of personal as well as data protection risk associated with the digital identity that is created by the users in the portal of MyLicense. The risks that are associated with informal digital identity are elaborated below: The safety of the users can be at risk: Due to data theft as well as hacking the informal digital identity can be at risk (Beduschi et al., 2017). It is identified that if proper security measures is not taken by the department of administration for security digital identity of the people then the safety of the people are at risk. Leakage of important as well as personal information: The personal information including, name, address, phone number can be hacked if the portal of DAS do not provide proper security (Bozkurt Tu, 2016). This will create number of challenges as well as risks for the people who uses the portal of MyLicence for renewing their license of the services. Leakage of financial information: The people generally login in the portal of MyLicense and renew their services. It is identified that the users can pay for the renewal online whose information can be stored within the portal (Reamer, 2013). If the digital identity of the persons faces risk then it would put the financial information at risk. The above risks that are faced by informal digital identity on the portal of DAS can be resolved or mitigated by adopting proper strategies as well as methods that are as follows: Digital identity must have proper security control: It is identified that by compromising the authorized users informal digital identity, the hackers can access the information ad as a result it would create number of security related issues (Balsam et al., 2015) Therefore in order to mitigate the issue it is quite important to authorize as well as authenticate the access of the user in order to secure digital identity. The Web access management must evolve in order to keep them ware about various security threats as well as vulnerabilities. Identity context must be important for insider threat as well as threat prevention: It is identified that the users of the portal of DAS are privileged with access in the remote location but it is very much important to evolve proper identity context as well as transactional attributes for making sure that legitimate users have accessed which further helps in avoiding the activities of fraudulent users (Simmonds, 2015). Identification of governance and analytics: It is identified that the department of administration must have customized IT driven identity management for governing the information as well as data of the people that are mainly stored within the portal in order to support their regulatory compliance (Al-Khouri, 2014). It is identified that proper auditing as well as risk teams must be present to focus on the threat of informal identity so that they can be able to make proper decision as well as strategies that are helpful in providing security risk management. References Al-Khouri, A. M. (2014). Digital identity: Transforming GCC economies.Innovation,16(2), 184-194. Balsam, K. F., Molina, Y., Blayney, J. A., Dillworth, T., Zimmerman, L., Kaysen, D. (2015). Racial/ethnic differences in identity and mental health outcomes among young sexual minority women.Cultural diversity and ethnic minority psychology,21(3), 380. Beduschi, A., Cinnamon, J., Langford, J., Luo, C., Owen, D. (2017). Building Digital Identities: The Challenges, Risks and Opportunities of Collecting Behavioural Attributes for new Digital Identity Systems. Bozkurt, A., Tu, C. H. (2016). Digital identity formation: socially being real and present on digital networks.Educational Media International,53(3), 153-167. Reamer, F. G. (2013). Social work in a digital age: Ethical and risk management challenges.Social work,58(2), 163-172. Simmonds, P. (2015). The digital identity issue.Network Security,2015(8), 8-13.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

4th Grade Lesson Plan for Expanded Notation

4th Grade Lesson Plan for Expanded Notation Students will create, read, and decompose large numbers. Class 4th Grade Duration One or two class periods, 45 minutes each Materials: paper or large note cards numbered 0 - 10 (enough for the whole class)chalkboard, whiteboard, or overhead projector Key Vocabulary place value, ones, tens, hundreds, thousands, ten thousands, hundred thousands, expanded notation (or expanded form) Objectives Students will demonstrate their understanding of place value to create and read large numbers. Standards Met 4.NBT.2 Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Lesson Introduction Ask a few volunteer students to come to the board and write down the largest number that they can think of and read aloud. Many students will want to put endless numerals on the board, but being able to read the number aloud is a more difficult task! Step-by Step Procedure: Give each student a sheet of paper or large note card with a numeral between 0 - 10.Call two students up to the front of the class. Any two students will work as long as they are not both holding a 0 card.Have them show their numerals to the class. For example, one student is holding a 1 and the other is holding a 7. Ask the class, â€Å"What number do they make when they stand next to each other?† Depending on where they are standing, the new number is 17 or 71. Have students tell you what the numbers mean. For example, with 17, the 7 means 7 ones, and the 1 is really 10.Repeat this process with several other students until you are confident that at least half of the class has mastered the two-digit numbers.Move on to three digit numbers by inviting three students to come to the front of the class. Let’s say that their number is 429. As in the above examples, ask the following questions:What does the 9 mean?What does the 2 mean?What does the 4 mean?As students answer t hese questions, write the numbers down: 9 20 400 429. Tell them that this is called â€Å"expanded notation† or expanded form. The term â€Å"expanded† should make sense to many students because we are taking a number and expanding it into its parts. After doing a few examples at the front of the class, have the students begin writing the expanded notation down as you invite students up to the board. With enough examples on their paper, when it comes to more complex problems, they will be able to use their notes as a reference.Continue adding students to the front of the class until you are working on four-digit numbers, then five-digit, then six. As you move into the thousands, you may want to become the comma that separates thousands and the hundreds, or you can assign the comma to a student. (The student that is always wanting to participate is a good one to assign this to - the comma will be called upon often!) Homework/Assessment You can give your students a choice of assignments  - both are equally long and equally difficult, though in different ways: Have students write 987,654 in expanded notation OR the largest number that they are able to.Have them write 20,006 in expanded notation (Be sure to go over this one in class the next day.) Evaluation Write the following numbers on the board and have students write them in expanded notation:1,78630,551516

Friday, March 6, 2020

Free Essays on Ordinary People

The book I did my report on is called Ordinary People, by Judith Guest. It is a very well written novel about a boy’s battle with depression, suicide, the loss of his brother, and communication gaps with his parents. The story starts by not telling you much about the situation, and the more the book ropes you in. The boy in the story starts out being 17, his name in Conrad Jarrett. Conrad had an older brother who died in a boating accident, he drowned. Conrad idolized his older brother, and never really came to terms with the loss, and about 1 year later, Conrad tried to take his own life. After that, his parents sent him to a hospital for the depressed, he spent 8 months there, and fell a year behind in school, and grew apart from his friends. This story starts when he is back in school and repeating his Jr. year. Throughout the story you see his ups and downs and recovery. Also, one of his main problems is communicating with his parents. His father feels tremendous guilt and just constantly tries to make him happy, but his mother on the other hand, resents him for trying t take his own life. In the end Conrad finally comes to terms with his loses, and faces his problems head on. He regains the friendships that, in his mind are worth it, and lets go of the ones that really weren’t. Conrad is the main character in this story. Throughout the story he undergoes many changes, good and bad. At first he goes through many low points, where he feels he has nothing, no friends no family, and no one to rely on. Until he finds a psychiatrist named Dr. Tyrone C. Berger. Mr. Berger helps Conrad to come to terms with his problems and face them. Conrad doesn’t develop any close relationships with anyone throughout the story until Berger comes along. Then he becomes involved with a girl named Jeannie. He develops a good relationship with her, and they are still going out at the end of the story. I think Conrad is a good kid that just tries t... Free Essays on Ordinary People Free Essays on Ordinary People What exactly makes a world and it’s people ordinary? In the spellbinding novel Ordinary People, Judith Guest gives readers a taste of life after having to deal with a terrible crisis, and introduces us to an ordinary family living in an ordinary world. The novel’s descriptive nature highlights the main character, Conrad’s, struggle in maintaining sanity in an ordinary world. Conrad Jarrett is a precise description of a teenager, having to deal with things every teenager his age has to go through daily. The internal conflicts he struggles with, especially his need for affection, and his sense of wanting to belong is what deepens the plot and intrigues readers even more. We see conrad’s point of view on life, of the world in which he lives, and where he sees himself fitting into. "†¦.Your sense of identity is what seems to have been misplaced. No. Wrong. You don’t lose what you never had." (pg.24) Readers can take his point of view and compare it with their own observations. The next issue is that the affection he is searching for, he gets from the wrong person, his father, while he really needs it from his mother. "†¦.She loves my father, I know that. She loved my brother, too. It’s just me."(pg.188). Trying to get his mother’s affection and approval is what in some ways intensifies his struggle, as well as affects h is parent’s marriage. The descriptions Judith Guest gives throughout the story, regarding all the different issues, that come up, make the book even more realistic, and in some instances even humorous. The descriptions given, depend of Conrad’s mood at that time. Although it may seem like it is a bad thing it’s not! The variety in the descriptions (which resemble his moods), add excitement to the novel, and make the story flow a lot better. The reader will know what to expect from a chapter, just from the descriptions given at that moment. For example, will it be humorous? Depressing? Touching? ... Free Essays on Ordinary People The book I did my report on is called Ordinary People, by Judith Guest. It is a very well written novel about a boy’s battle with depression, suicide, the loss of his brother, and communication gaps with his parents. The story starts by not telling you much about the situation, and the more the book ropes you in. The boy in the story starts out being 17, his name in Conrad Jarrett. Conrad had an older brother who died in a boating accident, he drowned. Conrad idolized his older brother, and never really came to terms with the loss, and about 1 year later, Conrad tried to take his own life. After that, his parents sent him to a hospital for the depressed, he spent 8 months there, and fell a year behind in school, and grew apart from his friends. This story starts when he is back in school and repeating his Jr. year. Throughout the story you see his ups and downs and recovery. Also, one of his main problems is communicating with his parents. His father feels tremendous guilt and just constantly tries to make him happy, but his mother on the other hand, resents him for trying t take his own life. In the end Conrad finally comes to terms with his loses, and faces his problems head on. He regains the friendships that, in his mind are worth it, and lets go of the ones that really weren’t. Conrad is the main character in this story. Throughout the story he undergoes many changes, good and bad. At first he goes through many low points, where he feels he has nothing, no friends no family, and no one to rely on. Until he finds a psychiatrist named Dr. Tyrone C. Berger. Mr. Berger helps Conrad to come to terms with his problems and face them. Conrad doesn’t develop any close relationships with anyone throughout the story until Berger comes along. Then he becomes involved with a girl named Jeannie. He develops a good relationship with her, and they are still going out at the end of the story. I think Conrad is a good kid that just tries t...

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Happiness Inherited or Gained (Nature vs Nurture) Essay

Happiness Inherited or Gained (Nature vs Nurture) - Essay Example There are hundreds and hundreds of things involved in the whole make up of the happiness. Your birth, your health, your parents, your achievements, your relationships etc. And as if all these things were not enough, now it is clear that your genes are also involved in the level of your happiness. responsible for your happiness [1] . The studies conducted on twins and animals show that genes matter a lot when it comes to happiness. However, at the same time these studies have also revealed that it is not just the genes but also the environment that is instrumental in shaping the personality of a human being [2] . This is a good news as it makes us hopeful that we do have a chance of being happy no matter what genes we are carrying. But it is not that easy. To achieve happiness, first of all, we have to understand what happiness is. Only after understanding what happiness actually means will we be able to be happy. Can happiness be taken out of the clutches of scientific studies and taken to a different dimension altogether? Isn’t happiness something beyond the understanding of science? And if not, then can we be courageous enough to be independent of the scientific studies and make our own way towards happiness, no matter what scientists say about our genes? Can we, in short, go beyond nature and nurture and be happy? The answer is ‘Yes’. The only need is to go beyond the strength of the genes and free ourselves of the environmental influence and take a courageous step to embrace the happiness. It is just a matter of decision, that’s it. To understand happiness, we have to understand the different aspects involved in it. We can divide